FENCE BUYER'S GUIDE: ASK THE RIGHT QUESTIONS

I want you to make a well-informed buying decision for your fence project. So I created a list of 24 questions to guide your project. The issues reflect a high commitment to project and industry standards.
If you have any questions, feel free to contact me at david@buildstrongfences.com.

When receiving a fence estimate, ask or observe...
Did the builder...?

  • Act professionally and arrive on time?
  • Listen to your wishes, concerns, and needs?
  • Plan to personally supervise the fence project?

  • Have a written agreement stating all details of the fence job?
  • Have a clear diagram of the fence location in relation to your home and neighbors?
  • Explain in writing which items and procedures that are included in the final price?

  • Offer material options with price breakdowns?
  • Provide an itemized detail of the price if requested?
  • Require a reasonable down payment not greater than 1/3 of the total quote?
  • Offer at least a one year written warranty?

  • Have written testimonials from past clients?
  • Have a list of references that you may contact on your own?
  • Have a clear reputation on the internet and in local chamber of commerce?

  • Have a license as required by your state, city, or county?
  • Plan to acquire appropriate city and county permits for your fence?
  • Use only eligible workers to construct your fence?
  • Notify utilities for easement clearances and work-order waivers?
  • Possess required liability insurance coverage?

  • Explain how long the fence will take to complete?
  • Know the covenants and standards for fences in your subdivision and city?
  • Have a plan to establish the fence within property bounds?
  • Have a procedure for measuring the contours of your property in order to adjust the fence height?
  • Have a plan and procedure for waste removal and cleanup at the conclusion of the job?
  • Have a plan for how he will respect your home, your family, and neighbors?


Contractor Licensing Requirements
Tennessee Construction Law